Parent Guide to the Curriculum

Broadalbin-Perth Intermediate School is the second stop along our students’ journey to graduation and college and career readiness. While each grade brings with it an increase in rigor and student accountability, we are dedicated to preparing our students academically, socially and emotionally for the many exciting challenges that lie ahead.

At BPIS, we work to foster in our students independence, a strong work ethic and a sense of pride in self, school and community. Our teachers collaborate with each other and with families, and we expect similar collaboration among students as they develop the tools necessary to build the future they want.

This guide is designed to provide you with an overview of what your child is learning. While we hope this will be a useful resource, we encourage you to partner with us, communicate with us and celebrate with us as we work together to provide an outstanding experience for our students.

How can you help your child succeed?

You play a very important role in your child’s academic performance. Here are some things you can do to support your child’s learning:

  • Encourage your child to read.
  • Help your child practice math facts.
  • Know what your child is expected to learn this school year.
  • Help your child set high short-term and long-term academic goals.
  • Provide a designated time and location to complete homework.
  • Talk to your child about what is happening in school and constantly monitor progress.
  • Advocate for your child.
  • Share your child’s strengths with your child and your child’s teacher.

Questions to ask your child’s teacher

When speaking with your child’s teacher about academic progress, here are a few questions you may want to consider asking:

  • What are the learning goals? Can you show me examples of student work that meets the learning goals?
  • May I see an example of my child’s work? How does it or doesn’t it meet these learning goals?
  • Is my child at or above grade level? What extra support is available? What can I do at home?
  • What classroom routines do you have that should also be used at home?
  • What kinds of questions could I ask my child on a daily basis about your class?

Talking to your child

Good conversations help our children see that we are interested in their lives. Here are a few conversation starters you may want to consider using:

  • Tell me about the best part of your day.
  • What was the nicest thing you did for someone today?
  • What was the hardest thing you had to do today?
  • Can you show me something you learned today?
  • What’s the biggest difference between this year and last year?
  • What rules are different at school than our rules at home? Do you think they’re fair?